Sunday, December 25, 2011

Navel Orange Marmalade

I don't know why navel orange marmalade is not more readily available. Seville oranges are the standard marmalade orange but the result is a very strong flavor that is hard to eat a lot of and leaves a lingering bitter aftertaste. However navel oranges, which are available everywhere, produce a much more mild marmalade that is still very fragrant and obviously bursting with orange flavor. I used a mandoline slicer to get perfectly thin half-moon orange slices. This recipe makes a lot of marmalade, unless you are planning on giving a jar to everyone you know, (like I did for Christmas) I would suggest cutting the recipe in half. Oranges are a winter fruit, they are in season now and I imagine almost any variety would work for a marmalade, just be sure to use organic oranges to avoid eating the residual chemicals from pesticides and herbicides that could be on the rinds.
Navel Orange Marmalade adapted from David Lebovitz and Ina Garten

Yield: 132 oz (I used 15- 80z mason jars and 1 12oz jar)
Cook time: 2 hours and 45 minutes plus 12 hours inactive time

7 organic navel oranges
2 lemons
8 cups of sugar
10 cups of water

1. Wash oranges and wipe them dry.
2. Cut the oranges and lemons in half lengthwise and use a mandoline slicer to cut them into very thin half-moon slices. Discard any seeds.
3. Place the sliced fruit and 10 cups of water in a large stainless steel stock pot. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring often. Remove from heat and stir in the sugar until it dissolves.
4. Cover and allow to stand overnight at room temperature.
5. Bring the mixture back to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer uncovered for about 2 hours.
6. Turn the heat up to medium and boil gently, about 30 minutes, stirring frequently to make sure it does not burn on the bottom.
7. Cook the marmalade until it reaches the jelling pint, about 220 degrees fahrenheit. Use a candy thermometer or test the marmalade by placing a small amount on a plate that has been chilled in the freezer and briefly return it to the freezer. Check it in a few minutes; it should be slightly jelled and will wrinkle just a bit when you slide your finger through it. If not, continue to cook until it is.
8. Remove from the heat.
9. In order to can in mason jars: Heat oven to 225 degrees fahrenheit and place jars (but not lids) on the baking racks. Jars will need to stay in the oven for at least 20 minutes. Boil the lids and place then on a clean towel, allow to dry completely. Fill your biggest, deepest pot with water and bring it to a rolling boil. Ladle the marmalade into the jars, fill to within 1/4 inch of the top. Wipe the rips cleans with clean paper towels. Place a clean lid on the jar and close tightly. Using tongs place each of the jars in the boiling water and boil for 10 minutes.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wonderful mixed with plain greek yogurt. The lemon marmalade is also delicious. Go to the April 2011 link.

Vicki said...

Hello! I'm making this marmalade right now! The recipe says 10 cups of water but the instructions say 8 and I can't find the other 2 cups? Is it 8 or ten, please!

Thanks,
Vicki :)

Paige said...

10 cups. Sorry! I will fix it now.

Vicki said...

Thank you! I'll add the two more cups of h20 in the morning. It smells divine already!

Paige said...

That should be perfect. Let me know how it turns out and enjoy!

Vicki said...

It is sooo beautiful and tasty. I used 8 tangelos right off the tree. Made 15 half pints and one recycled King Kelly 18 oz. jar. Took some photos of these gleaming jars in the afternoon sun. With thanks.

Paige said...

Yum! Tangelos sound perfect, especially ones that fresh!